EE header

 Electrical Engineering Courses at Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, Level 4
Level 1 Courses: EE101, EE195, EE196
Module Code EE101 Title Electrical Engineering
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 1.5 Pre-requisites None
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Mrs Janaki Premaratne Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 80%
Continuous assessment by coursework (Best 4 of 5 labs considered for evaluation) - 20%

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Overview (2 hrs)

  2. Electrical Power and National Development, Role of the Electrical Engineer.
    Introduction to Power Generation, Transmission, Distribution and Utilisation including Modern Drives. SI Units. Basic concepts.
  3. Network Theorems (4 hrs)

  4. Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s Law, Superposition theorem, Thevenin’s theorem, maximum power transfer theorem, Millmann’s theorem. Star-Delta transformations. Nodal and Mesh analysis.
  5. Alternating Current theory (8 hrs)

  6. Sinusoidal waveform, phasor and complex representation. Impedance, Power and Power factor. Analysis of simple R, L, C circuits using alternating current. Magnetically coupled circuits. Mutual Inductance.Solution of simple network problems by phasor and complex number representation.
    Three phase - Advantage of three phase, Star and Delta configurations. Phase sequence. Balanced and unbalanced systems. Power factor correction.
  7. Electromagnetic and Electrostatic theory (2 hrs)

  8. Basic Electrostatic and Electromagnetic theory ; Force and torque development in magnetic circuits.
  9. Electrical Measurements (3 hrs)

  10. Direct deflection and null deflection methods. Ammeters, Voltmeters, Wattmeters, Energy meters. Extension of ranges.
  11. Electrical Installations (3 hrs)

  12. Fuses, miniature circuit breakers, earth leakage circuit breakers, residual current circuit breakers, earthing, electric shock. IEE wiring regulations, basic domestic installations.

Recommended Texts:
  1. D P Kothari, I J Kothari, “Theory and Problems of Basic Electrical Engineering”, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi
  2. Vincent Del Toro, “Electrical Engineering Fundamentals”, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi

Module Code EE195 Title Engineering Design
Credits 1.5 Non-GPA Hours/ Week Lectures 1.0 Pre-requisites None
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Mr B S Samarasiri/Prof J R Lucas Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 1 hours duration - Design Principles/Case Studies - 40% Continuous assessment of Design Assignment & final presentation - 60% Conducted during June term

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Design Principles(12 hrs)

  2. Introduction to Engineering Design, Life Cycles of Engineering Products and processes, Design process and Design Tools, Concurrent Engineering, Creativity and Reasoning, Analysis, synthesis, simulation, Evaluation and Decision Making.
  3. Case Studies (12 hrs)

  4. Several simple but comprehensive design case studies selected from different disciplines of engineering addressing the topics (a) Design for Manufacturing, (b) Mechanical and material aspects in design, (c) Electrical, Electronic and IT aspects in design
  5. Design Assignments (18 hrs - 4 weeks)

  6. Group based design assignments (Topics to be selected by Engineering Design Centre in consultation with the department)
    The project will include (a) gathering of data and information from various sources as a preliminary to the design, (b) preparing a work plan and delegating duties, (c) working with others and to produce results by given deadlines and within given costs, (d) learning the basic procedures required for conceptual, preliminary and detailed designs, (e) learning the importance of the cost component in the manufacturing process, (f) preparing a report and making a presentation on the work done, (g) demonstrating the working of the prototype

Recommended Texts:

  1. Design and Technology: James Garratt, Second Edition, Cambridge, University Press 1998
  2. Product Development: Kapila Jayasinghe, Sarvodaya Vishwa Likha Publishers, 2000.
  3. Technology in Practice: Technology Enhancement Programme / JohnCave/ Andy Bardill, John Murray Publishers, London 2000
  4. Case Studies in Engineering Design: Clifford Matthews, Arnold Publishers -1998

Module Code EE196 Title Engineering Skill Development
Credits 1.5 Non-GPA Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites None
Lab/Tutorials 9/2
Lecturer: Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : Continuous assessment by coursework /final group report/oral assessments - 100 %

Learning Objectives

To develop the practical (hands on) skills of students in engineering (workshop, drawing, AUTOCAD, PSpice etc).

Outline Syllabus

Final group report should include the use of the basic tools mentioned above and presentation of the manufactured product. Individual oral assessments may also be held to determine the contribution of individual members to the product.
 

Recommended Texts :
 


EE header

Level 2 Courses: EE201, EE222, EE223, EE224, EE226, EE227, EE285, EE290, EE295, EE296
Module Code EE201 Title Theory of Electricity
Credits 5 Hours/ Week Lectures 4 Pre-requisites EE101
Lab/Tutorials 1
Lecturer: Prof Rohan Lucas Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 3 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework (Best 8 of 10 to 12 labs) - 30%

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Introduction (4 hrs)

  2. Review of Basic circuit elements - Volt-ampere relationships, energy storage and dissipation.
    Response to a unit step, natural behaviour of RLC circuits.
    Review of Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s Laws, Network theorems using d.c.
    Electrical Safety : fuses, MCBs, electric shock, RCCBs, earthing, earth resistance and earth resistivity.
  3. Alternating current theory (10 hrs)

  4. Review of Maximum, root mean square and average values; form factor.
    Reasons for choice of sinusoidal waveform.
    Review of Phasor representation of sinusoids, complex notation and complex representation, power and power factor. Solution of simple network problems by phasor and complex number representation.
    Loci diagrams for RL and RC circuits.
    Impedance and impedance functions of circuits, Review of series and parallel resonance.
    Review of Mutual Inductance, coupling coefficient, dot notation, analysis of coupled circuits.
    Analysis of transformer as a coupled circuit
  5. Circuit Theory (12 hrs)

  6. Network Theorems - Superposition, Thevenin’s, Norton’s, Millman’s, Reciprocity, Maximum power transfer, Nodal - Mesh Transformation and compensation theorems using a.c.
    Elements of topology, dual networks, Nodal and mesh analysis, Matrix formulation.
    Basic two port theory.
  7. Three-Phase Analysis (8 hrs)

  8. Review of Phase sequence, star and delta connections.
    Analysis of three phase balanced circuits. Single Line Equivalent diagrams.
    Three phase unbalanced circuits: Analysis, symmetrical components.
  9. Non sinusoidal waveforms (10 hrs)

  10. RMS values, power, harmonics, analysis using the Fourier series.
    Fourier Transform, Laplace Transform.
    Solution of simple network transients using the Laplace transform.
     

Recommended Texts :

  1. Electric Circuits, E.A.Edminster, Schaum Outline Series, McGraw Hill
  2. Theory and Problems of Basic Electrical Engineering, D P Kothari, I J Kothari, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi
  3. Electrical Engineering Fundamentals, Vincent Del Toro, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi

Module Code EE 222 Title Electrical Measurements
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE101 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Dr Thrshantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework (Best 5 of 6 labs) - 30%

Learning Objectives

To learn the principles of electrical measurements and to learn common instruments and methods used in simple measurements.

Outline Syllabus

  1. General principles of measurements

  2. Objectives of engineering measurements; composition of measuring systems; comparison of direct and null methods; Types of data - static, transient & dynamic.
    Standards: Absolute and working standards; Calibration of meters.
  3. Measuring instruments

  4. Moving coil, moving iron, dynamometer, induction, thermal, electrostatic and rectifier type; shunts and multipliers; Galvanometers: versatile, Ballistic and Vibration; Measurement of current, voltage, power, energy and resistance; Measurement of insulation resistance; Sensitivity, damping and response time of meters. Current transformers and potential transformers.
    CRO: Electron gun, deflection, time base, focusing, storage
  5. Bridge methods

  6. Direct current potentiometer, Wheatstone bridge, Kelvin double bridge; Alternating current potentiometers (co-ordinate and polar types), simple a.c. bridges: Sensitivity of bridges.
  7. Transducers

  8. General principles of action - active and passive tranducers; loading effects; examples of transducers for measurement of non electrical quantities.
  9. Statistical basis of measurement

  10. Accuracy, precision and repeatability. Signal analysis - Fourier transform, statistical operation, convolution, correlation, power density spectra, sources and minimisation of error, sampling theory.
  11. Illumination

  12. Definition of terms; Laws of illumination; Polar Curves; Photometry; Luminous efficacy; types of electric lamps - incandescent, electric arc, discharge; illumination of surfaces; levels of illumination.

Recommended Texts :
  1. Electrical Measurements and Measuring Instruments, E W Golding and Widdis, ELBS and Sir Isaac Pitman and Co Ltd
  2. Electrical Measurements and Measuring Instruments, S Rao, Khanna Publishers, Delhi

Module Code EE 223 Title Introduction to Electrical Machines
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE101 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework (Best 5 of 5 or 6 labs) - 30%

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Classification of Electrical Machines

  2. Definition of Machines
    Linear & rotary Machines
    Comprehensive classification of motors & generators
    General purpose, special purpose & servo grades
    Types of frames, enclosures and installations
  3. Machines in Motion Control

  4. Motion control system of motor, power processor and intelligent micro control
    Selection of Motors according to their principle characteristics and load requirements
    Types of power processors & intelligent controllers
    Effects of drive systems on the supply
    Reduction of noise & EMI
  5. Machines in Electrical Power Generation

  6. Structure of generating system
    Hydro, thermal & induction generators and their essential features & differences
    Voltage & frequency adjustment
  7. Direct Current Machines

  8. Basic constructional features and principle of operation
    Shunt, series & compound motors, torque/speed characteristics, typical applications
    Starting, speed control & braking.
  9. Power supplies for motion control applications

  10. Diode converters of single phase & 3-phase, and other types
  11. Single Phase Transformers

  12. Basic constructional features, magnetizing current & waveforms, equivalent circuit and phasor diagram, per unit system, efficiency and voltage regulation, open circuit & short circuit tests, parallel operation.
    Pulse transformers, high frequency transformers, high frequency equivalent circuit, frequency response, energy losses

Recommended Texts:
 


Module Code EE224 Title Introduction to Power Systems
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE 101 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Dr H Y R Perera Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework - 30%

Learning Objectives

To learn about the power system in Sri Lanka and to be able to make simple calculations relating to the power transmission and distribution systems and the fundamentals of protection.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Energy and electricity supply and usage -

  2. Global and local situation and trends, introduction to energy conversion.
    Development, structure and management of the electric power system in Sri Lanka
    Renewable and conventional generation techniques.
    Future potential and directions
  3. Power transmission systems

  4. Overhead and Underground systems, conductor and cable types.
    Short, medium and long line models and calculations, Ferranti effects, shunt and series compensation.
  5. Introduction to Protection

  6. Current and potential transformers, characteristics of protection devices (fuses, thermal devices, relays) and their limitations, Overcurrent relays (IDMT and directional), differential protection, distance protection, protection systems for generators, transformers, busbars and transmission lines, introduction to digital protection systems.
  7. 4.0 Power Distribution

  8. Overhead and underground systems, feeders and distributors, ring and radial systems, distribution substations, principles of electricity tariff formulation, tariffs in Sri Lanka, end use equipment, introduction to demand management and conservation of electricity.

Recommended Texts:

 
 
 
Module Code EE226 Title Electrical Properties of Materials
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites none
Lab/Tutorials 0
Lecturer: Dr H Y R Perera Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by 1 or 2 assignments - 30%

Learning Objectives

To know the basic theories in the behaviour of dielectric and magnetic materials and their classifications and applications.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Dielectric Materials (14 hrs)

  2. Polarization of a medium, free and bound charges in a capacitor;
    Relationship between electric field, polarization, displacement, permittivity and susceptibility.
    Time dependent behavior, consequences in frequency domain, complex permittivity, Kramers-Kronig relations equivalent circuits, absorption.
    Polarization mechanisms : Interfacial, orientational, lattice displacement, atomic and electronic polarizabilities, resulting frequency and temperature dependence of permittivity; dielectric constants of solids, liquids and gases.
    Ferro - electricity : P-E relationship, internal field, temperature dependence, use in capacitors.
    Ionization, dielectric loss, dielectric strength, volume and surface resistivity,
    Thermal classification of dielectrics. Piezo electricity & Pyro electricity : use in transducers.
  3. Magnetic Materials (8 hrs)

  4. Magnetic moment, magnetisation, orbital and spin magnetic moment, quantum mechanical model of electronic magnetic moments, classification of magnetic behaviour of solids.
    Microscopic theory of magnetism: diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, ferrimagnetism; Curies’s law, Curie-Weiss law, Curie temperature.
    Ferromagnetic domains: Domain patterns, energy considerations, domain walls, Bloch Walls, Neel Walls, domain rotation and wall motion; magnetostriction, effects of magnetic anisotropy, induced stress anisotropy, thermomagnetic treatment, pinning of domain walls by strains and by impurities, effects of micro-structural features on magnetisation curve; control of coercivity and permeability.
    Magnetic materials for practical applications and their characteristics: Soft magnetic materials; soft iron, iron-cobalt, iron-silicon, nickel-iron and amorphous alloys, cubic ferrites, Hard magnetic materials: Alnico alloys, hard ferrites, Samarium cobalt, manganese alloys, neodymium-iron-boron alloys, powder magnets. Materials for information storage; square ferrites, ferric oxide, chromium dioxide, hexagonal ferrites, bubble domain devices.

Recommended Texts:

 
Module Code EE227 Title Engineering Acoustics
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites none
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Mrs Janaki Premaratne Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70%
Continuous assessment by coursework - 30%

Learning Objectives

This subject covers the fundamentals of Engineering Acoustics and some basic applications in Engineering Noise Control. The subject also provides the foundation for the study of Engineering Acoustics at higher levels and research. Since this subject has a multi-disciplinary foundation and applications it is open to all fields of engineering.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Fundamentals and Basic Terminology (5 hrs)

  2. Acoustic field variables and wave equation, acoustic impedance, reflection, absorption and transmission
    Sound intensity, sound power and sound pressure, relationship between sound power and sound pressure, sound levels, combining sound levels
    Air borne sound and structure borne sound
  3. Noise Measurement and Rating (5 hrs)

  4. Instrumentation for noise measurement and analysis, sound level meter, frequency weighting, time weighting, factors affecting sound level meter reading, correction for background noise, time varying noise measurements and rating, measurements based on sound dosage, equivalent continuous A weighted sound level, day-night equivalent level, aircraft noise rating, physiological effects of noise, noise pollution, permissible noise exposure limits
  5. Sound Power, its Use and Measurement (3 hrs)

  6. Radiation field of a sound source, determination of sound power using intensity measurements, pressure measurements
  7. Sound in Enclosed Spaces (4 hrs)

  8. Sound absorption mechanisms, measurement of absorption coefficient and impedance.
    Reverberation, reverberation time, Sabine's reverberation formula, measurement of reverberation time
  9. Sound Level Estimation (3 hrs)

  10. Fan noise, air compressors, refrigerator compressors, cooling towers, pumps, gas and steam vents, control valve noise, control valves for liquids and steam, pipe flow noise, boiler noise, turbine noise, exhaust noise, casting noise, outlet noise, furnace noise, electrical motor noise, generator noise, transformer noise and gear noise
  11. Active Noise Control (4 hrs)

  12. Interference in plane wave sound fields, constructive and destructive interference of sound, physics of active control of sound using plane wave model of a 1D enclosed sound field, plane mono-pole source in an infinite duct, cancellation of downstream radiation by using a single secondary plane mono-pole source

Recommended Texts:

 
Module Code EE 285 Title Applied Electricity (Elective for Outside Group)
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 1.5 Pre-requisites EE101 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70%
Continuous assessment by coursework (Best 5 of 5 or 6 labs) - 30%

Learning Objectives

To be able to make simple calculations on the performance of different types of electrical machines and to know the basics of controlling them. To learn about the arrangements of distribution systems and the economics of power utilisation.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Electrical Machines (14 hrs)

  2. Transformers (04 hrs)
    Emf equation, equivalent circuit & phasor diagram, losses & efficiency, voltage regulation, test on transformers, three phase transformer connections.
    Induction Motors (04 hrs)
    Types f rotors and windings, production of rotating magnetic field, induction motor action, torque speed characteristics, losses and efficiency, starting and speed control, ratings and applications, single phase induction motor
    d.c. motors (02 hrs)
    Characteristics of series, shunt and compound motors, starting and speed control, industrial applications
    Special purpose motors (02 hrs)
    Stepper motors : operation,types and applications
    Universal motors : Constructional and operational characteristics
    Solid state control (02 hrs)
    Introduction to solid state speed control of dc and ac motors, heating and welding
  3. Electrical Wiring & Power Distribution(04 hrs)

  4. Arrangement of distribution systems (02 hrs)
    Wiring symbols & circuits; Distribution cables; voltage drop calculations for concentrated and distributed loads; typical examples of power distribution layouts in factories
    Economics of power Utilisation (02 hrs)
    Cost of electric power: fixed charges and variable charges, tariffs; reduction of energy costs; power factor correction

Recommended Texts:

 
 
Module Code EE290 Title Field Visit 1
Credits 1.0 Non GPA Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites Being in Level 2
      Lab/Tutorials 3    
Lecturer: Dr Nishantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : Assessment by report/oral examination - 100%

Learning Objectives

To get a basic insight to the field of electrical engineering as practiced in industry.

Outline Syllabus

The course will take the form of one or more field visits to places of interest to electrical engineering graduates, such as power stations, switchyards, electrical installations, electrical manufacturing plants, renewable energy plants and micro hydro plants.
The visits will usually be limited to a maximum of one day.
The student will be assessed through an assignment to be submitted on the observations and experiences gained during the visit. Oral examination of the content of the report may also be used in the evaluation
 
Recommended Texts:

 
Module Code EE295 Title Communication Skills
Credits 1.0 Non-GPA Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites None
Lab/Tutorials 3
Lecturer: Prof Rohan Lucas Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : Continuous assessment by coursework & oral presentations - 100%

Learning Objectives

To improve the basic communication skills - critical reading, verbal communications and on writing
 

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the student should be able to:

Outline Syllabus

Critical reading of technical literature and summarising contents.
Verbal communications and writing skill development.
Planning, preparing, and revising informative and forceful communication.
Adapting the speech and the written material for the intended audience.
 
Recommended Texts:
 
Module Code EE 296 Title Presentation Skills
Credits 1.0 Non-GPA Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites None
Lab/Tutorials 3
Lecturer: Dr H Y R Perera/Prof Rohan Lucas Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : Continuous assessment by Seminar type presentations & coursework (presentations + assignment) - 100%

Learning Objectives

To improve the basic presentation skills, both technical and non-technical.
critical reading, written presentations and on presentations utilising the computer

Outline Syllabus

Written presentations and multi-media presentations.
Each student will be required to give one or more computer based technical presentations as well as one or more written presentation on non-technical topics.
The seminar type presentations aim to give a tool for interpersonal communication, projects presentation, public speaking, and report writing.
 
Recommended Texts:

 
 

EE header

Level 3 Courses: EE301, EE302, EE320, EE321, EE322, EE323, EE324, EE325, EE390, EE399
Module Code EE 301 Title Generation & Transmission
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE101. EE201 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Dr N Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70%
Continuous assessment by coursework (1 compulsory assignment ~ wk 3 + best 4 of 5 labs) - 30%

Learning Objectives

To be able to make in-depth calculations in the broad areas of Power Generation Technology, Power transmission systems and mechanical characteristics of lines.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Power Generation Technology (8 hrs)

  2. Fossil fuel-based generating systems (coal steam, oil steam, diesel, gas turbine, combined cycle, combined heat and power)
    Nuclear Energy Systems, nuclear fuel cycle, types of reactors.
    Hydro electric systems - storage, run-of-river, micro/mini, pumped storage.
    New and renewable energy systems - wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wave, tidal OTEC, geothermal - current status of development and future potential
    Environmental and ecological considerations, safety issues
    Economic comparison of power generation systems
  3. Power Transmission systems (12 hrs)

  4. Overhead and underground systems, conductor and cable types, insulating materials, line construction and accessories. Environmental issues, concerns about biological effects of electric and magnetic fields.
    Calculation of transmission line parameters; resistance, inductance, capacitance for solid, stranded and bundled conductors. Transposition.
    Insulators: Types, electrical and mechanical specifications. string voltage distribution and efficiency.
    Short, medium and long line models and calculations, Ferranti effects, shunt and series compensation.
    Generalised circuit constants, equivalenent T and PI models
    Receiving end, sending end and universal circle diagrams, line power limits.
    Introduction to network planning, optimisation.
  5. Mechanical Characteristics of Lines (4 hrs)

  6. Mechanical Characteristics of Overhead Lines:
    Choice of route, types of towers, conductor spacing and configuration
    Sag and span calculations, sag templates, stringing charts

Recommended Texts:
 
 


Module Code EE302 Title Power Electronics
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE101, EN101. EE223 Preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Dr J P Karunadasa Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework (Best 4 of 5 labs) - 30%

Learning Objectives

To learn about the heavy current, power switching devices and to be able to apply these devices in conversion and control applications.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Heavy Current - High Voltage Power Switching Devices [04 hrs]

  2. Characteristics of diodes, thyristors, triacs, gate turn off thyristors (GTOs), power BJTs and power MOSFETs, power insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) and other MOS-bipolar hybrid devices.
    Drive circuits, protection including thermal designs.
  3. Power electronic converters [12 hrs]

  4. Square wave and PWM inverters of voltage fed and current fed types, single phase and three phase types, voltage and frequency control.
    Adjustable dc to dc converters of switch mode and resonant mode types.
    ac voltage controllers, ac to dc thyristor converters
  5. Stepper and Brushless dc drive systems [8 hrs]

  6. Principle of operation of stepper and brushless dc motors of different types. Structure of power electronic drive system, method of control, analysis of performance, application aspects.
 
Recommended Texts:

 
Module Code EE 320 Title Programming Project
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites CS101, CS102
Lab/Tutorials 6
Lecturer: Dr Nalin Wickramarachchi Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : Continuous assessment by coursework - 100%

Learning Objectives

To design, implement, and test of a comprehensive software system both individually as well as in a team.

Outline Syllabus

The programming project aims to develop the programming skills of the individual either to work individually or as part of a team. It makes use of the computer skills aquired at level 1.
The assignment based subject will take the form of one or more individual or group projects assigned by the department.
The student or group of students will be required to develop working, functional programs using a language of his/their choice.
Students will be assessed based on the program developed, a report submitted on the program, and the demonstration of the program.
 
Recommended Texts:

 
 
Module Code EE321 Title Advanced Circuit Theory
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE101. EE201 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 0
Lecturer: Prof H Sriyananda Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by assignment - 30%

Learning Objectives

In this course DC and AC fundamentals are applied to the study of electrical networks. In this course the responses of varied circuits to basic input functions are analyzed by using transform methods.
To learn about the synthesis and design of electrical circuits and to apply them to classical and modern filter design.

Outline Syllabus

  1. s-plane: (2 hrs)

  2. The general complex exponential excitation function; Network functions; Pole-zero patterns; properties of LC, RC & RLC network functions; energy functions
  3. Introduction to the state space representation: (2 hrs)

  4. The selection of state variables, transformations, canonical forms-eigen values.
  5. Techniques of equation formation and solution: (4 hrs)

  6. Modifications to networks, sparse representations etc. Solution of transient equations-state space equations, finite element and finite different methods.
  7. Synthesis of passive networks: (4 hrs)

  8. Synthesis of LC, RC & RLC networks; Cauer, Foster canonical forms and other methods.
  9. Classical Filter Design: (4 hrs)

  10. Characteristic impedance, propagation constant, image impedance, matching, low pass, high pass and band pass filters, basic sections, cascade sections and terminations crystal filters
  11. Modern Filter Design: (4 hrs)

  12. Design philosophy, Butterworth Tschebycheff approximations etc., scattering matrix (reflection coefficient) realisation, frequency transformations
  13. Introduction to active filter design: (4 hrs)

  14. Amplifiers, Gyrators and negative impedance converter (NIC) techniques, realisations, sensitivity

Recommended Texts:

 
 
Module Code EE322 Title Control Theory
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE101, EE223 pref.
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Dr Thrishanth Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework (2 group assignments on weekly schedule) - 30%

Learning Objectives

To learn the basics of Control and modelling systems and to be able to apply them.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Introduction to Control Systems: (2 hrs)

  2. Control systems terminology and basic structure, history of automatic control, feedforward-feedback control structure, multivariable control systems, control system design, design examples
  3. Mathematical Models of Systems: (2 hrs)

  4. Introduction, state variable models, impulse response models, transfer function models, models of disturbances and standard test signals, dynamic response, characteristic parameters of first and second order models, models of mechanical, electrical, thermal, hydraulic and pneumatic systems, obtaining models from experimental data, systems with dead-time elements, loading effects in interconnected systems; Models of industrial control devices and systems: Introduction, generalized block diagram of a feedback system, block diagram manipulations, signal flow graphs, DC and AC motors in control systems, motion control systems
  5. Feedback Control: (2 hrs)

  6. Introduction, the control objectives, feedback control system characteristics, on-off mode of feedback control, proportional-integral-derivative modes of feedback control, multivariable control systems
  7. Concepts of Stability: (3 hrs)

  8. Introduction, Bounded-input Bounded-output stability, zero-input stability, the Routh Stability Criterion, stability range for a parameter
  9. The Performance of Feedback Systems: (3 hrs)

  10. Introduction, the performance specifications, response of a standard second order system, effects of an additional zero and an additional pole, desired closed loop pole locations and dominance condition, steady state error constants and system type number, design and compensation, optimal performance indices
  11. Compensator Design using Root Locus Method: (3 hrs)

  12. Introduction, the Root Locus concept, guidelines for sketching Root Loci, reshaping the root Locus, cascade lead compensation, cascade lag compensation, cascade lead-lag compensation
  13. The Nyquist Stability Criterion and Stability Margins: (3 hrs)

  14. Introduction, Nyquist Criterion, Nyquist plots, stability margins, the bode plots, stability margins on the bode plots, frequency response measurements
  15. Feedback System Performance based on the Frequency Response: (3 hrs)

  16. Introduction, Performance specifications in frequency domain, correlation between frequency domain and time domain specifications, constant M-circles, the Nichols Chart
  17. Compensator Design using Bode Plots:

  18. Introduction, reshaping the bode plot, compensation
     

Recommended Texts:
 
 


Module Code EE323 Title Electrical Installations
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE101. EE224 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer:  Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework( 1 assignment ~wk10 20%, 5 labs 10%) - 30%

Learning Objectives

To learn about the symbols, types of lighting and protection of equipment in buildings and to be able to sketch electrical wiring diagrams, be able to select cables, and to be able to test an electrical installation.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Wiring Diagrams and Design (8 hrs)

  2. Conventional Symbols for domestic and industrial installations: Lighting, socket outlets, rotating machines, transformers
    Domestic and industrial lighting: Types of lamps and their operation, Lighting levels, design
    Sketches and drawings of electric wiring circuits: Layout diagrams, single line diagrams, conduit diagrams.
    Documentation: BOQs, Technical specifications, Technical schedule
  3. Electrical Installations in Buildings (16 hrs)

  4. IEE Wiring Regulations: Structure and importance
    Protection of persons and equipment: Fuses, MCBs, MCCBs, ELCBs, RCCBs
    Selection of cables: Temperature dependence, Rating factors, current rating, voltage drop
    Earthing Systems: TT system, TN systems
    Testing of Electrical Installations: Earth electrode resistance calculation and measurement, earth resistivity measurement, continuity and insulation measurement.

 
Recommended Texts:

 
 
Module Code EE324 Title Computer Aided Design and Simulation
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 1 Pre-requisites CS101, CS102
Lab/Tutorials 3
Lecturer: Dr Nalin Wickramarachchi Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One computer based examination of 2 hours duration - 60% Continuous assessment by coursework - 40%

Learning Objectives

To develop skills in using common computer aided engineering design and simulation packages.

Outline Syllabus

Recommended Texts:
 
 


Module Code EE325 Title Electrical Measurement Systems
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE201 EE222 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Prof. H. Sriyananda Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 50% Continuous assessment by coursework - 50%

Learning Objectives

To be able to select and implement an appropriate measurement system for a simple application

Outline Syllabus

  1. Transducers

  2. Principles of conversion from non-electrical to electrical signals.
    Measurement of non-electrical quantities.
  3. Digital measurements

  4. D/A and A/D Conversion
    Sampling
    Measurement of current, voltage, resistance, elapsed time and frequency
  5. Signal analysis

  6. Transform methods
    Convolution and correlation
    Power density spectra
  7. Measurement systems

  8. Analogue and digital systems
    Filtering, differentiation and integration of signals
    Interference, Shielding
  9. Introduction to digital signal processing

  10. FIR and IIR filters

Recommended Texts:

  1. Electronic Measurement Systems
  2. Doebelling
 
Module Code EE390 Title Field Visit 2
Credits 1.0 Non-GPA Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites Being in Level 3
Lab/Tutorials 3
Lecturer: Dr Nishantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : Assessment by Report/Oral Examination - 100%

Learning Objectives

To get an detailed insight to the field of electrical engineering as practiced in the electrical manufacturing industry.

Outline Syllabus

The course will take the form of one or more field visits to places of interest to electrical engineering graduates, such as power stations, switchyards, electrical installations, electrical manufacturing plants, renewable energy plants and micro hydro plants. Students will be required to make a more detailed study of the major components than at Level 2.
The visits will usually be of two day duration.
The student will be assessed through an assignment to be submitted on the observations and experiences gained during the visit. Oral examination of the content of the report may also be used in the evaluation
 
Recommended Texts:

 
Module Code EE399 Title Industrial Training
Credits 6.0 Non-GPA Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites Being in Level 3 or Level 4
Lab/Tutorials 35
Lecturer: Mr Nihal Wijewickrema /Dr Nishantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Scheme of Assessment : End of Training Examination - Oral Examination Continuous assessment by workplace/daily diary/report. Conducted through 1 Semester and 1 term.

Learning Objectives

Learning Outcomes

Outline Syllabus

There are a number of elements of training which should be covered.

EE header

Level 4 Courses: EE401, EE402, EE410, EE420, EE421, EE422, EE423, EE424, EE425, EE426, EE427, EE428, EE429, EE430, EE490
Module Code EE 401 Title AC Machines
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE101. EE223 preferred
  Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Dr J P Karunadasa Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework (3 labs, all) - 30%

Learning Objectives

To learn about the creation of a rotating field and to be able to analyse three phase induction motors, synchronous motors and single phase motors and their applications.

Outline Syllabus

  1. Three-phase windings (6 hrs)

  2. Elementary and distributed three phase windings of lap, wave and concentric types.
    mmf distribution, winding factors, rotating magnetic field, harmonic mmf, effects of current harmonics, induced voltage.
  3. Three-phase Induction motors (08 hrs)

  4. Constructional features of squirrel cage rotor and wound rotor motors.
    Theory and operation, development of the equivalent circuit & analysis, effects of rotor parameters, supply voltage and frequency on torque characteristics, modes of operation, tests to determine equivalent circuit parameters.
    Starting methods, speed control, classes of squirrel cage motors and reasons for their choice.
  5. Three-phase Synchronous Generators (08 hrs)

  6. Constructional features of cylindrical and salient pole rotor generators.
    Theory of operation of cylindrical and salient pole generators, space time vector diagram, equivalent circuit, isolated and grid connected operation, power-angle characteristics, stability limit, operating chart, synchronization, active and reactive power sharing between parallel generators, voltage regulation, tests to determine equivalent circuit parameters. Synchronous motors and synchronous generators.
  7. Single Phase Motors (04 hrs)

  8. Theory of operation of single phase induction motor of split phase and capacitor types, equivalent circuit and its analysis, shaded pole motors, reluctance and hysteresis type single phase synchronous motors, universal motors.

Recommended Texts:
 

 


Module Code EE402 Title Insulation Co-ordination
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE204
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Prof J R Lucas Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework (2 or 3 labs, 1 visit ~wk 5, 1 assignment ~ wk8) - 30%

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Lightning Phenomena [4 hrs]

  2. Mechanism of Lightning: Frequency of occurrence of lightning flashes
    Lightning Problem for Transmission Lines: Shielding by overhead ground wires, Calculation of Shielding angle, Area of attraction of transmission systems to lightning
    Effects of Lightning on a Transmission Line: Strokes to Phase-conductor, tower with no earth wire, Earth Wire, Nearby objects (Indirect Strokes)
  3. High Voltage Transient Analysis [10 hrs]

  4. Surges on Transmission Lines, Travelling wave solutions
    Surges on Transmission Lines: Surge Impedance and Velocity of Propagation, Energy stored in surge,
    Reflection of Travelling waves at a Junction, Bewley Lattice Diagram, Reflection and Transmission at a T-junction,
    Representation of Lumped Parameters, Branch Time Table for digital computer implementation
    Transform Methods of solving Transients
  5. Surge Protection: [10 hrs]

  6. Spark gaps for surge protection, Expulsion Tube Lightning Arrestor, Surge Diverters; Selection of Surge Diverters, Separation limit for lightning arrestors
    High Voltage Surge Generators: Double exponential waveform, Calculation of coefficients  and , Definition of Wavefront and Wavetail times of practical waveforms, Wavefront and Wavetail Control, Operation. Multi-stage Impulse Generators. Generation of chopped impulse waveforms
    Voltage Distribution in a Transformer Winding.
    Length of Overhead Shielding Wire: Modification of Waveshape by Corona
    Conventional method of insulation co-ordination
    Statistical Method of Insulation Co-ordination: Evaluation of Risk Factor

Recommended Texts:
 


Module Code EE410 Title Independent Study 1
Credits 1 Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites EE101. EE201 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3
Lecturer: Prof Priyantha Wijayatunga Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : Continuous assessment by coursework/assignment/presentation - 100%

Learning Objectives

To develop the ability of students to do unsupervised work

Outline Syllabus

Recommended Text s:
 
 
 
Module Code EE420 Title Project
Credits 10 Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites Being in Level 3 or 4
Lab/Tutorials 15×2
Lecturer: Dr Nishantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - Presentation of technical paper/demonstration and oral examination Continuous assessment by supervisor

Learning Objectives

Design project allows students to apply electrical engineering skills to a multidisciplinary project. Specific skills developed include: project definition, planning, and scheduling, effective written and oral communication of technical ideas, incorporation of realistic constraints and engineering standards, functioning effectively on a multidisciplinary team, and the ability to learn and apply new ideas as needed to meet project goals.

Outline Syllabus

This course is designed to introduce the student to principles of comprehensive design of an electrical/electronic project. The student may work within a small engineering team to design and
develop a project, or the student may work alone on a project, depending on class size. Students are expected to develop a complete plan from feasibility study, cost analysis and electrical design
and documentation through the building of a prototype. All students must make a formal written and verbal presentation at the completion of the course.
 
Recommended Texts:

 
 
Module Code EE421 Title Power System Protection
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE224
Lab/Tutorials 0
Lecturer: Visiting Lecturer Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by assignment (Best 2 of 3 labs) - 30%

Learning Objectives

To learn about power system protection in Sri Lanka and to be able to make simple calculations and apply protection to simple power systems.

Outline Syllabus

1.0 Current and potential transformers

Equivalent circuit analysis of CTs, CT ratings and types (Measuring and protection -5P, 10P and class X), CT saturation, Basic principles of PTs.

2.0 Protection devices

Fuses, thermal devices - characteristics and limitations
Protective relayings - Types ( Electro-mechanical, induction, static and numeric), static and numeric relay design criteria and performance comparison.

3.0 Over current relays

Basic requirements (sensitivity, discrimination etc..), Discrimination methods - discrimination by current, discrimination by time and discrimination by time & current
Inverse Definite Minimum Time (IDMT) over current relays - characteristics, grading of the relays in a system.
Directional over current protection

4.0 Protection of high voltage transmission systems

Distance protection - amplitude and phase angle comparators, implementation of relay characteristics using the comparators ( impedance relay, Ohm relay, Mho relay) , protection zones, relay schemes
Transformer Protection - Abnormalities in transformers & protective measures, Basic theory on Differential protection, Application of general differential protection principle to transformers (Consideration of winding arrangement, turns ratio and inrush current), Bucholtz relays
Generator Protection - Stator protection scheme, Rotor protection scheme, Overall protection of a generator with a generator transformer.
Pilot wire protection of transmission lines, Busbar Protection

Recommended Texts:
 
 


Module Code EE 422 Title Power Distribution & Utilization
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE204
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Dr Nishantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework - 30%

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Three phase transformer : (8 hrs)

  2. Construction, vector groups, magnetising phenomena, initial current inrush, voltage and current harmonics, harmonic suppression, unbalanced loading, parallel operation.
  3. Power Distribution (6 hrs)

  4. Feeders and distributors;. Ring and radial systems, distribution substations.
    Pin type and post type insulators
  5. Distribution Economics (6 hrs)

  6. Demand patterns - load profile, load-duration characteristics, load factor, utilisation factor, load estimation.
    Tariffs - Principle of tariff formulation, typical tariff structures, tariffs in Sri Lanka.
    Transmission and Distribution loss optimisation.
  7. Utilization (4 hrs)

  8. End-use efficiency - power factor improvement, efficient lighting and industrial applications.
    Demand side management.

Recommended Texts:
 


Module Code EE 423 Title Power System Analysis
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE204
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Prof P D C Wijayatunga Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework (1 assignment ~wk 8 + 3 labs, all) - 30%

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Power Flow Analysis: (8 hrs)

  2. Analogue methods of power flow analysis: dc and ac network analysers
    Digital methods of analysis: Power Flow algorithms and flow charts, analysis using iterative techniques.
  3. Power system faults (8 hrs)

  4. Causes and effects of faults. Review of per unit system and symmetrical components.
    Symmetrical three-phase faults. unsymmetrical faults, short circuit and open circuit conditions.
    Introduction to simultaneous faults
  5. Power System Stability: (8 hrs)

  6. Steady state stability: Power angle diagram, effect of voltage regulator, swing equation
    Transient stability: Equal area criterion, stability under fault conditions, step by step solution of swing equation

Recommended Texts:
 


Module Code EE 424 Title Rural Energy & Environment
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE204 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 0
Lecturer: Dr Nishantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration - 70% Continuous assessment by coursework  - 30%

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Rural Energy Systems:

  2. Rural energy supply and usage, typical community energy systems
  3. New and Renewables:

  4. Wind, solar, wave, biomass and other emerging technologies
  5. Energy and the Environment:

  6. Environmental impact in development, conversion, transport and consumption of energy. Mitigatory measures. investment decision under environmental constraints.

Recommended Texts:
 


Module Code EE 425 Title Electrical Drives and Applications
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE203. EE304/EE401preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration Continuous assessment by coursework

Learning Objectives


 

Outline Syllabus

  1. DC motor drives (08 hrs)

  2. Dynamic model of dc motors, electromechanical and electrical time constants, starting and braking transient.
    Two and four quadrant dc drives using transistor converters and choppers, continuous and discontinuous modes of operation.
    Closed loop control and dc drives.
  3. Three-phase induction motor drives (08 hrs)

  4. Four quadrant drives using voltage source invertors, constant V/f and constant V modes of control, initial voltage boost, analysis of operation.
  5. General engineering aspects of electrical machines (08 hrs)

  6. General aspects: Machine sizing, types of frames, electric and magnetic loading, choice of pole number, types of enclosures, mounting, reduction of noise.
    Rating of machines: Nameplate data, losses, temperature rise, selection of motors for continuous, variable and short time duty applications.
    Cooling of machines: Types of cooling and coolants, cooling of turbo and hydro generators.
Recommended Texts:
 
 
Module Code EE426 Title Energy Studies
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE204 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 0
Lecturer: Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration
Continuous assessment by coursework

Learning Objectives

 

Outline Syllabus

  1. Introduction:

  2. World energy picture - Energy resources: coal, oil, gas, uranium; major reserves, depletion rates. Energy consumption in developed and developing countries, regional consumption patterns, sectoral consumption, per capita consumption.
    Energy sector in Sri Lanka - Development and status, resource and supply patterns, consumption patterns, sectoral consumption.
  3. Energy and the Economy:

  4. Energy demand analysis, energy economy interaction, GDP elasticity, typical developed and developing country models, determinants of demand, demand forecasting.
  5. Energy Planning:

  6. Energy database, supply options, policy analysis, Integrated National Energy Planning.
  7. Energy Management:

  8. Supply-side issues, power system loss optimization.
    Demand-side management- End- user energy conservation, efficiency improvement and demand management.
    Energy auditing- Energy systems in industrial and commercial buildings and aggro-processing activities. Project formulation and evaluation.
  9. Energy Economics:

  10. Economic comparison of energy supply systems, optimal energy mix, energy substitution, financial and economic cost-benefit analysis of energy sector projects.
  11. Energy Pricing:

  12. Long-run, Short-run marginal costing, electricity tariffs and petroleum product pricing.
  13. Nuclear Power

Recommended Texts:

 
Module Code EE427 Title High Voltage Breakdown & Testing
Credits 2.5 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE206 preferred
Lab/Tutorials 3/2
Lecturer: Prof.J.R.Lucas Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration Continuous assessment by coursework

Learning Objectives

 

Outline Syllabus

  1. High Voltage Breakdown Phenomena [8 hrs]

  2. Breakdown Characteristic in gases: Electron Avalanche Mechanism, Townsend Breakdown Process, Streamer Mechanism, Time lags of Spark breakdown.
    Corona Discharges, Mechanism of corona formation, Power Loss due to Corona
    Breakdown in Liquids: Breakdown of Commercial liquids; Breakdown due to gaseous inclusions, liquid globules, solid particles;
    Breakdown of Solid Insulating Materials: Electro-mechanical breakdown, Breakdown due to internal discharges, Surface Breakdown, Thermal Breakdown, Electro-chemical Breakdown, Chemical Deterioration, Breakdown of Composite Insulation.
  3. High Voltage Generators for Testing [8 hrs]

  4. Generation of High Alternating Voltages: Cascade arrangement of transformers, Resonant Transformers, High frequency high voltages
    Generation of High Direct Voltages: Rectifier circuits, Voltage Multiplier Circuits, Electrostatic generators: Van de Graeff generator, Sames Generator
  5. High Voltage Measurements and Testing [8 hrs]

  6. Electrostatic voltmeter, sphere gaps, potential dividers, matching , peak reading meters, Klydonograph
    Type tests, Sample Tests, Routine Tests
    Oscilloscopes for the measurement of fast transients
    Measurements of capacitance and loss tangent: High Voltage Schering Bridge, Dielectric loss measurement, Detection of internal discharges, Measurement of dielectric constant and dissipation factor of a liquid dielectric
    General tests carried out on High voltage equipment. Testing of solid dielectric materials.

Recommended Texts:

 


Module Code EE 428 Title Power System Control and System Modelling
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE204
Lab/Tutorials 0
Lecturer: Dr.Nishantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration
Continuous assessment by coursework

Learning Objectives


 

Outline Syllabus

  1. Introduction to Frequency and Voltage Control of a Power System (4 hrs)

  2. Load Control & Frequency Stability, Automatic Load Frequency Control, AVR and Voltage Control, Reactive Power Control.
  3. System Frequency Control and Governors (6 hrs)

  4. Dynamic model of a governor, different governors in power plants, primary load frequency control, concept of control area.
  5. Power System Modelling and Frequency Control (6 hrs)

  6. Dynamic model of Power System, ALFC Control, Control techniques (PI, PID, Modern Control), Synchronous and asynchronous interconnections, use of PSCAD for system modelling.
  7. System Stability and Load Shedding (4 hrs)

  8. Effect on system stability by adding generators and loads, load shedding criterion, system reliability.
  9. Voltage Control and Reactive Power Generation (4 hrs)

  10. AVR System, voltage profile & power transfer, voltage control of generators and droop settings, step up transformers and voltage injection.

Recommended Texts:
 


Module Code EE 429 Title Power System Planning & Operation
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE204
Lab/Tutorials 0
Lecturer: Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration
Continuous assessment by coursework

Learning Objectives

Outline Syllabus

  1. Power System Economics: (6 hrs)

  2. Economic operation of power systems: load dispatch with power system constraints, merit order loading, use of lagrange multipliers and penalty factors
  3. Power System Planning & Reliability: (6 hrs)

  4. Introduction to long term planning, reliability, probabilistic production costing
  5. Switchgear & Circuit breakers: (6 hrs)

  6. Types of switchgear, fuses.
    Fault clearing and interruption of currents, arc formation, methods of quenching, restriking and recovery voltage transients.
    Principle of operation, indoor and outdoor types, miniature circuit breakers; oil, air, vacuum, Sulphur hexafluoride and air blast circuit breakers
  7. System grounding & Substation earthing (6 hrs)

  8. Ungrounded, effectively grounded, resistance grounded and resonant grounded systems
    Neutral Earthing. Step and Touch potentials.
    Grounding of delta connected ungrounded systems

Recommended Texts:
 


Module Code EE430 Title Advanced Control
Credits 2 Hours/ Week Lectures 2 Pre-requisites EE322
Lab/Tutorials 0
Lecturer: Prof. H. Sriyananda Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration Continuous assessment by coursework

Learning Objectives


 

Outline Syllabus

  1. Hardware and Software Implementation of Common Compensatotrs: (4 hrs)

  2. Introduction, passive electric networks, operational amplifier usage, use of digital computer as a compensator device, configuration of the basic computer control scheme, principles of signal conversion, digital implementation of analog compensators
  3. Nonlinearities in the Closed Loop and Control Performance: (4 hrs)

  4. Introduction, Models of nonlinearities in the closed loop, describing function analysis, stability analysis by the describing function method, non-linear system on the phase plane, system analysis by the phase-plane method, optimal switching in bang-bang control systems
  5. Controller Tuning: (4 hrs)

  6. Introduction, a brief review of analog PID controllers, adjustment features of industrial controllers, practical controller tuning, Ziegler-Nichols tuning method, tuning for minimum error integrals, digital PID controllers
  7. Control System Analysis using State variable Methods: (6 hrs)

  8. Introduction, state variable representation, conversion of state variable models to transfer functions, conversion of transfer functions to canonical state variable models, solution of state equations, concepts of controllability and observability, the design of state variable feedback systems, Optimal Control Systems
  9. Digital Control Systems: (6 hrs)

  10. Introduction, digital control system applications, sampled data systems, the z-transform, closed loop feedback sampled data systems, stability analysis in the z-plane, performance of a sampled data second order system, digital computer compensation, the Root Locus of digital control systems, implementation of digital controllers
     

Recommended Texts:
 
 


Module Code EE490 Title Field Visit 3
Credits 1 Hours/ Week Lectures 0 Pre-requisites Being in Level 4
Lab/Tutorials 3
Lecturer: Dr Nishantha Nanayakkara Instructor in Charge:
Lecture Time Place Lab Time Place
Scheme of Assessment : End of Semester Examination - One paper of 2 hours duration Continuous assessment by coursework

Learning Objectives


 

Outline Syllabus

The course will take the form of one or more field visits to places of interest to electrical engineering graduates, such as power stations, switchyards, electrical installations, electrical manufacturing plants, renewable energy plants and micro hydro plants. Students will be required to make a more detailed study of the major components than at Level 3.
The visits will usually be of two or 3 day duration.
The student will be assessed through an assignment to be submitted on the observations and experiences gained during the visit. Oral examination of the content of the report may also be used in the evaluation
 

Recommended Texts:
 
 


06 February 2004